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The Molecular Epidemiology and Genetic Environment of Carbapenemases Detected in Africa

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dc.contributor.author Osei Sekyere, J
dc.contributor.author Govinden, U
dc.contributor.author Essack, SY
dc.date.accessioned 2018-06-14T09:58:41Z
dc.date.available 2018-06-14T09:58:41Z
dc.date.copyright 2016-01
dc.date.issued 2016-01
dc.identifier.citation Osei Sekyere, J, Govinden, U & Essack, SY 2016, ‘The Molecular Epidemiology and Genetic Environment of Carbapenemases Detected in Africa’, Microbial Drug Resistance, Vol. 22, No. 1, pp. 59-68, Viewed 13 June 2018, Mary Ann Liebert, DOI: 10.1089/mdr.2015.0053 en_US
dc.identifier.issn 1076-6294
dc.identifier.uri https://www.liebertpub.com
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/10907/2103
dc.description.abstract Research articles describing carbapenemases and their genetic environments in Gram-negative bacteria were reviewed to determine the molecular epidemiology of carbapenemases in Africa. The emergence of resistance to the carbapenems, the last resort antibiotic for difficult to treat bacterial infections, affords clinicians few therapeutic options, with a resulting increase in morbidities, mortalities, and healthcare costs. However, the molecular epidemiology of carbapenemases throughout Africa is less described. Research articles and conference proceedings describing the genetic environment and molecular epidemiology of carbapenemases in Africa were retrieved from Google Scholar, Scifinder, Pubmed, Web of Science, and Science Direct databases. Predominant carbapenemase genes so far described in Africa include the blaOXA-48 type, blaIMP, blaVIM, and blaNDM in Acinetobacter baumannii, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Enterobacter cloacae, Citrobacter spp., and Escherichia coli carried on various plasmid types and sizes, transposons, and integrons. Class D and class B carbapenemases, mainly prevalent in A. baumannii, K. pneumoniae, E. cloacae, Citrobacter spp., and E. coli were the commonest carbapenemases. Carbapenemases are mainly reported in North and South Africa as under-resourced laboratories, lack of awareness and funding preclude the detection and reporting of carbapenemase-mediated resistance. Consequently, the true molecular epidemiology of carbapenemases and their genetic environment in Africa is still unknown en_US
dc.description.sponsorship National Research Foundation (South Africa) en_US
dc.format.extent 11 P. en_US
dc.format.medium PDF en_US
dc.language.iso en en_US
dc.publisher Mary Ann Liebert en_US
dc.rights Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 3.0 United States *
dc.rights.uri http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/3.0/us/ *
dc.subject Molecular Epidemiology of Carbapenemases en_US
dc.subject Africa en_US
dc.title The Molecular Epidemiology and Genetic Environment of Carbapenemases Detected in Africa en_US
dc.type Article en_US
dc.rights.holder Mary Ann Liebert en_US


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